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on leaks by edward snowden. in a moment we will be joined by journalist glenn greenwald who first broke the snowden story. first, we turn to saturday's protest in washington. it was organized by the stop watching us coalition. jesselyn radack, a former justice department who now works for the government accountability project, read a message from edward snowden. >> we are here to remind our government officials that they are public service -- servants. this is about the unconstitutional, unethical, and immoral actions of the modern- day surveillance state, and how we all must work together to remind the government to stop them. know,bout our right to our right to associate freely, and to live in a free and open democratic society. [applause] witnessing an american moment in which ordinary people from high school to high office stand up to oppose a dangerous trend in government. we are told what is unconstitutional is not illegal. but we will not be fooled. we have not forgotten the fourth amendment in our bill of rights prohibits government that only from searching our personal effects
if edward snowden lost sean penn, he has to many can be hasn't lost me. >> any concerns? >> i don't know what's in his mind. i don't know what he's doing now. he might be in a hot tub with two russian strippers named i want to drink a lot. he's done some service, getting us to at least debate the issue and as far as stuff gone on the last week or so with the european allies being up sit, i can understand if they felt their personal cell phones were being tapped. but on the other hand, they should really climb a little bit. it's been 60, 70 years since america defended allies, especially in europe. we liberated europe twice in the last century. they never wanted to pay the premiums for being protected. cut us a little slack when we protect you. the 9/11 plot was hatched in germany. there are much more restive muslim populations on the european continent than here. we over do it all. there is no doubt about that. cut us slack for the protection we've given you-all this time. >> that could be an endorsement of what the nsa has been doing and what you said about edward snowden. so where do y
edward snowden right thing in the major german news weekly dish beagle he's put forward what he calls his manifesto for truth in which he calmed and state security agencies around the world didn't set out to simeon only handle so that journalists that if published his articles in various publications around the world. he also delays on to saying that we need to stop this kind of spying culture that is taken over it's all parts of a teenager and that and make a set of articles about edward snowden inmates in the gym and paper it comes on the back if that support for edwards to admit it in geneva on animosity increase we've seen a group of over fifty as senior figures calling for him actually to be granted asylum in germany now in the optical it to say that something that perhaps they had the car in german government wooden supports pounds because suggesting a bed and some of skeletons in their own clothes that could come out if there was a mean age investigation into just exactly what's it going on in tennis if the nsa spying program. how about a monk spends fifty that say that it snowed a
bombing reminded us that terrorism is still an ex existentialnd threats. a month later, edward snowden revelationsing about massive surveillance that our government was doing. this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. as you heard from greg, it is our mission at rand to improve the quality of public policy decision-making. that is why we brought together this panel. people who have different views. everyone here has deep expertise. we are hoping to have an open discussion. there will be some things and questions they will be unable to answer because of the situations. we will try to guide the discussion over a few topics. we will start with trying to understand what works with intelligence security and why we feel we need to put measures in place. we are then going to turn to what are the increased risks of mass collection of data on the public? are the what implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. ofserves as an overarching the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face
spied on by there were reports of him coming from edward snowden. and then a separate report in the el mound doe newspaper indicated that some 60 million people in spain, as well as 35 world leaders. their phones being tapped. giving some rather interesting numbers that have not been disclosed before. he said that their mission began on september 11th which is a reframe that has been heard time and time again, as this debate raged on, he said that on that day, 2,996 people were killed on september 11th, but here is the part that is that public has never heard before, he said that 20 beam from the nsa have been killed fighting what is called the war on terrorism, since then, and that 6,000 people from the nsa were deployed i guess to gather intelligence. he says there has not been a mass casualty in this country since 2001, he says that is not by luck, they have not stopped trying. he also points out that they have stopped 13 incidents in the united states, another 25 incidents across europe. anyclapper also saying he believes that we have been lawful, with regards to what has been taki
. >>> and edward snowden says british counterparts to the nsa are some of the worst offenders to government oversight. >>> welcome to "around the world." police came within minutes of stopping the alleged l.a.x. shooter from heading to the airport before friday's rampage. one. new details we're learning today. this is from an exclusive interview with a woman who knows the suspect and his three roommates. 23-year-old paul ciancia is charged with murdering a tsa officer. ciancia is in critical condition after being shot by police officers. the fbi says he set out to kill tsa employees, and now a woman who knows the suspect tells our miguel marquez, that one roommate, who had no idea what was going on, even drove him to the airport. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he said he was going back home. either that his dad was kind of sick and he had to deal with some family issues. >> did anyone ever see a ticket? >> no. >> he did mention what day. that morning, he doesn't knock and says, i need to leave. can you take me now. >> d
what we see is that the potential risk to the united states of leakers like edward snowden changes the calculus of who we conduct intelligence against. i don't think there should be any principled reason not to spy on allies, but you have to take into account the risk it's going to be disclosed and that can be harmful. it underlines the extent of edward snowden's treason that all of this is out in public. our intelligence gathering has been damaged in ways we can hardly talk about. >> you talk about both sides, conservatives and republicans, are commenting about this. let's read two examples of that. one is from investors, business daily, they have an editorial. we seem to be going out of way to alienate friends and allies in recent months. they all have found to varying degrees an unreliable partner in the united states under president obama. they're conservative. let's look at what's in the "new york times" this morning. i've seen an america that was respected, hated, feared, and loved, but i was confronted repeatedly with an attitude toward america that i've never heard before.
♪ >>> okay, everyone it's time to hash it out. big news about edward snowden. the associated press tweeted edward snowden has found a job in russia. snowden's employer says fugitive client has been hired by russian web site. starts new tech nickel gig tomorrow. security reasons. got that? that's ironic. >>> this takes war games to the new level. msn pulls up carpet monopoly. she found a life size monopoly board under the carpet. >>> and talk about a sink, the tweeting time tweeting school shutdown and kids hospitalized after six grade i boys spray too much ax body spray. emergency crews investigating hazardous smell. the smell was axe. when it comes to body spray less is more. time to hash it out with us. take a look at this issue. who is this? who is she dressed up as for halloween? tweet me your guesses using #greta and we will rewe veal the answers later in the show. take a look at this. unbelievable. coming up, is your health at risk? a doctor is here with an urgent warning about obama care. that's next. >>> insurance plans are not just dropping you, the patients, they are also droppin
. >> for the last several month, documents that the whistleblower edward snowden leaked showed a dragnet beyond france and spain. it's failed to become a major issue in washington. the bugging of angela merkel's phone received attention because the strategic implications of being caught. the focus worries a visiting delegation of european parliament airians investigating the scale of the u.s. program. >> spying on friends, not just on leaders, on citizens. >> tuesday's hearing was primarily about the u.s.'s domestic surveillance operations with james clapper and keith alexander key to restrict changes to variability of collecting data of u.s. citizens. >> more to come on al jazeera. coming home to start again. we are in the philippines town of zamboanga, where the standoff destroyed the homes of 10,000 families. and women out of work in iran. we look at the underrepresentation in the country's labour force. stay with us. >>> welcome back. a recap of the top stories - another senior leader of the muslim brotherhood has been arrested in egypt. the pictures are said to show esam el-arian when tak
national security agency contractor, edward snowden, one former aide to the chancellor said that snowden has done the western world a great service and it's up to us to help him. today on "face the nation," rejecting the idea that snowden be granted any clemency. >> can he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee. that didn't happen. and now he's done this enormous disservice to our country and i think the answer is no clemency. >> a republican counterpart in the house also dismissed the idea. >> no, i don't see any reason. you know, we -- i wouldn't do that. >> the suspect in friday's fatal shooting of a tchl sa altsa age has been charged with murder. paul ciancia wrote a note indicating that he intended to die during the attack. he survived after being wounded by the police. >>> four prominent scientists, including james hansen, distributed a joint letter citing the need for nuclear power plants. they wrote renewables like wind and solar and biomass cannot scale up fast enoug
will not fall into the wrong hands. >> there'll be no clementsy for edward snowden. he's asking for leniency from the government. members of the white house denied his request. he leaked secret government documents about the n.s.a., including information that the u.s. has spied on allies. if he returns to the u.s. he faces charges of espionage. he is in russia where he was granted asylum. >> a gunman involved in the killing at los angeles international airport talked to police. he told them he acted alone, the admission coming after he was shot by officers. he killed a t.s.a. employee and injured three others. the 23-year-old is facing murder charges and the death penalty. he's in critical condition and under 24 hour armed surveillance. >> an alabama airport is being reopened after a bomb threat. officials at birmingham-shuttlesworth international airport say they found a note warning of a pom in the main terminal -- of a bomb in the main terminal and called the federal bureau of investigation. after a sweep the airport was cleared. it was up and running two hours later. a dozen flight were
to changing the retirement age. many of those recipients say they want more benefits. >> edward snowden could face a tough punishment if he ever returns to the u.s. many rejected his request for leniency. snowden was charged with espionage after leaking classified documents about the nsa surveillance program. he's currently in russia where he was granted asylum. >>> tha film about the life of nelson mandela will soon be near you. we have the nelson family reaction. >> i'm prepared to die. >> the long walk to freedom had a tough task. from nelson mandela's days as a young man committed to the struggle of racial equality. the film spares no details of his 27 years behind bars. a time that history and the film proved only made the man and his cause stronger. >> your struggle, your commitment, and your discipline has has brought me to stand before you today. >> we should remember where we come from, and that this freedom was hard, and that it was won at a very, very heavy price. >> the $35 million film documents the inner works of the family. the film marked the day in south africans went to the
on the surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden, and secrets that are revealed are doing damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, mexico and other countries where the suggestion is that we've lisped in -- listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions it ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> it's a different view from the chairman of the house homeland security committee. congressman peter king says america should stop apologising for the nas. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives - not just the united states, but france, germany and throughout europe. the french carried out spying operations ai gaips the united states -- against the united states. as far as germany - that's where the hamburg plot began laing to nchb -- leading to 9/11. >> former secretary of state madeleine albright agrees, saying the u.s. is not the only one that spies on world leaders, but says france listened to her calls. a french ambassador once ask her about something she said on a private call. madeleine albright said: >> a roadside bo
is that these reports were based on the misreading of a single slide released by edward snowden. and that slide showing these numbers in millions and so on. but in fact, the nsa collected no information in europe. they say that any information, i in of this meta data, that's with a it was. not phone call or conten was done by european services, not by the nsa. that it was not in fact the citizens of those countries, france and spain, but collected from a number of sources by the u.s. and nato allies in support of military operations abroad. here's how they made that case at the hearings today. >> the assertions by spain, italy, that nsa collected ten of million of phone call are completely false. to be perfectly clear, this is not information that we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> so in effect, they're saying that one of the strongest reasons for this anger we've been seeing from europe started with nothing. the misinterpretation, erin, of a single power point slid
and four others wounded in the attack. >> edward snowden's plea for clementsy has been denied by the white house and congress. he made the plea in a letter. white house where are said edward snowden should return to the u.s. and face charges for allegedly leaking classified information. >> secretary of state john kerry's visit to the middle east - his stop in cairo was his first visit to egypt since mohamed morsi was deposed. john kerry insisted the withholding of aid to the military is not punishment. we discussed it earlier with military experts. >> he's trying to appeal to the public opinion. >> in egypt? >> in egypt, not the u.s. in egypt, after what happened last june or july, asking president mohamed morsi and the american reaction towards what happened, which a lot of egyptians thought was hostile and inappropriate. they thought the american government was siding with the muslim brotherhood. it created uneasy innocence. john kerry is trying hard to restore the image of the u.s., trying to build bridges with the egyptian government. >> should he be building a bridge with the governme
can abuse the power that has been given to them. that includes rogue actors. edward snowden did not do what the government expected. in los angeles there was the public disorder and intelligence division that compiled information and used it for political purposes. information that is collected for law enforcement and security purposes is often used on political groups. >> if i could provide some perspective. the fbi operates through mandates that are codified in statute laws written by our congress and signed by the president into law. that process has produced, appropriately and necessarily, oversight, not just in the executive branch of government itself. the department of justice is obviously in the fbi as well. but also with the congress and through the court system and the judicial branch. that is to make sure that they and and day out, the work we are doing -- day in and day out, the work we are doing is representing the people of the united states and is what is required at that point in time. they have an expectation that we use those tools. they have an equal expectation that
n.s.a. leaker edward snowden is that the u.s. government apparently monitored the phone calls of at least 30 world leaders, including most infamously, german chancellor angela merkel, who was holding up a new encrypted cell phone to say you can't touch me now. a little m.c. hammer there. brit, we've heard about mass data collection. but when you're talking about targeted, the phones of our allies, our friends, people that president obama sits in the oval office with and at summits with, is that over the line? >> do we know if the phones were being actually listened in on and calls recorded and the substance of the calls noted? or is this another case where we have her phone calls, we know whom she called and when and for how long they spoke? my own guess is that it is that which i'veñr just described. and moreover, this has been going on for a long time in one way or another. we spy on foreign leaders, theyñr spy on our leaders or try to. we're better at it perhaps than they are and they don't like it. now it is out in the open. the people affected have to be indignant, and
about the fallout from the edward snowden leaks. >> this is the most serious leak, most serious compromise in the u.s. intelligence committee. >> because of the amount of it and the type. >> the amount and the type. >> website reboot. secretary of hhs kathleen sebelius faces questions on capitol hill wednesday after healthcare.gov went down over the weekend adding fuel to the criticism and more fodder for snl. >> i have a number of friendly tips to help you deal with those problems. for example, have you tried restarting your computer. sometimes it helps to turn the computer off and turn it back on. we don't know why. it just does. >> poetic license, the literally legend maya angelou joins us this hour. children's love for books. >> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. edward snowden's leaks keep coming faster than the white house can even respond. over the weekend the nsa claimed president obama had no idea angela merkel's personal cell phone was tapped back since 2002. so how credible is that denial? joining me now is chuck todd nbc's white house correspondent, politic
made by former nsa contractor edward snowden. he describes himself as a whistleblower, but others say he's a traitor. >> christiane amanpour has spoken with the journalist who worked closely with edward snowden to expose these secrets and joins you now from london. you had that interview with glenn greenwald. what struck you most about him, he is one determined man on a bit of a mission really. >> he continues to insist that despite the vociferous criticism that officials have leveled at the snowden leaks and at him and the press for publishing them, it is not all about terrorism. he keeps saying loorks, they want us to believe that everything that's being leaked is just about life and death terrorism. but it's not. there are a lot of other revelations, a lot of revelations about economic and commercial and industrial espionage. there are a lot of revelations obviously which started the firestorm of protests around the world. about spying and collecting metadata from ordinary citizens. that is what really drives glen green wald really, really crazy and let me play you just a little bi
correct because of some of the issues that edward snowden has been able to put out. their mission lately has been to try to make the american people more aware of the terrorist plots that have been foiled because of their action. over theseen red chili summer and even this week general alexander and director clapper be more forthright over the plot that have been foiled third if you count europe, it gets into the couple dozen area. that is something we have to be able to put out there to give reassurance to people like your that the intelligence community are doing all they can to protect us from international terrorism. host: our guest, michael allen, managing director of beacon global strategies, author of "blinking red -- crisis and compromise in american intelligence after 9/11." former majority staff, other position similar to that as well. south carolina, democrat line. caller: hi, pedro. i had a comment and a question for mr. allen. you are uniquely qualified to answer my question. that ient is added up is am a retired master sergeant, and the phrase plausible deniability -- that
that several agency across asia were part of the spying. >> edward snowden wants to help germany figure out if the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone. he offered to help with the investigation and even offered to be a witness. the official says "he knows a lot." he is prepared to come to germ my and give testimony. the official says snowden insists that before coming to germany, "conditions must be discussed." he sent the a personal letter to merkel, which will be red publicly today. >> powerful storms pound the parts of ohio. >> the severe weather is expected to last through tonight, as well. ten people were injured. strong winds damages businesses and downed power lines. the storm caused flash floods on wednesday in sections of texas that left two dead. tornado warnings have been issued, high went gusts are also expected in new york and new england. >> let's bring in our meteorologist. >> very busy system here. what can we expect. >> very busy, we have close to 200 reports, five being tornadoes, close to 150 being wind reports, and also multiple reports of hail across much of the coun
by contractor edward snowden. this comes amid the political fire storm over whether president obama was informed that the german prime minister's phone calls were wiretapped. >> giving any document at all about any world leader, the person briefing him or the briefing bookie would have to say where it came from, especially since it's so controversial, so sensitive, i should say. to no. i can't believe as commander in chief, as president of the united states that if this was being done that he didn't know about it. >> and others, democratic operatives, say there's every reason to believe the president did know that there was this danger and this is why he gave up his blackberry. >> when the private gave up his blackberry the day he became president and he was upset he had to give it up, why? because other countries would be listening in on it. the real miracle or stunning thing to me is that the british purchase thought she could talk to a cell phone and no one would be listening to her, allies or foes would be listening in on her conversations. of course we were. >> how does the n.s.a. respond t
operates outside of the country. >> this move comes after nsa leaker edward snowden indicated the u.s. was eavesdropping on german chancellor angela merkel and 34 other foreign leaders. dozens of pages of top secret u.s. documents were declassified on monday. in an parent bid to show the nsa was acting legally when it gathered millions of americans phone record. >>> the obama administration is granting a six-week extension to americans who want to sign. for obama care coverage. the new deadline is march 13st and extended because the website has a number of problems. we are told the website is back up and running now. >>> when it comes to terrorism the future looks frightening. cnn obtaining a sobering new report that reveals casualty and attacks are on the rise. as chris lawrence reports, there is no end in sight to that troubling trend. >> reporter: it's not your imagination. terrorists are launching more attacks like this deadly assault on a nairobi mall. and it's likely the world will see even more violence next year. cnn obtained exclusive access to an upcoming report from stark
on to say that media outlets have misinterpreted documents that were leaked by edward snowden. and much of the data from europe was collected by intelligence agencies of our allies. they collected the phone records said general alexander and shared them with the u.s. >>> u.s. special forces reveal they were just hours from embarking on a dangerous covert operation earlier this month to capture a major benghazi terror suspect. special forces were ready if ordered to capture ahmed abu khattala. the mission never materialized. partly because there was so much publicity inside libya and the western press about another raid in libya just hours later. that raid led to the capture of suspected al qaeda operative abu anas al libi in tripoli. and he's in u.s. soil. >>> maliki will meet with president obama on friday. he is asking the u.s. for more counterterrorism aid and he'll also discuss purchasing american-made apache highlights and other equipment. senate leaders are warning that maliki is leading america back to civil war and he's who tao receptive to the influence of iraq and iran. >>> bo
operations. >> but for the last several months, documents the whistle blower edward snowden leaked showed a global dragnet behind france and spain and it failed to become a major your issue in washington. the bugging of angela merkel's phone received attention because of the strategic implications of being caught. it worries a european delegation of parliament airians investigate ght the scale of the program. >> spying on friends, not just leaders, citizens. >> tuesday's hearing was about the u.s.'s domestic surveillance operations with james clapper and keith alexander key to restrict legislative changes to collect the phone call data of u.s. citizens. >> you are watching al jazeera newshour. still to come - mineral rich, but mired in chaos. the security crisis in the central african republic. and we visit a shelter for teenage mothers in kenya, who have been abandoned by their family. >> and miami heat celebrate their title and kick off the new season in style. joe will be here with the details later. . >>> a bus caught fire on a highway between bangalore and hyderabad in india. up to 4
concerned by the allegation. information was leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden and the prime minister said the government has not broken any laws. a worker strike in the indoe knee is a region is in the second day and demanding more pay and better conditions and unions say two million people took part on the strikes on thursday but police say the figures are much lower. thailand now where a controversial bill granting amnesty to politicians for crimes they committed is a step closer to becoming law and could allow return of former prime minister who is in self imposed exile after being in corruption. this is from bangkok. >> reporter: this is the most devie civ issue in thailand. the lower house approved the bill and introduced three months ago and a movement against it was formed. it grants blanket amnesty to those who committed crimes of politics over the last nine years and some people who are on trial or in jail for crimes during violent protests. it includes former prime minister sinawa who is in exile after being convicted of corruption charges. the party holds majorit
york's time square in 2010. >> edward snowden's plea for clemency has been denied. the whistle blower who has asylum in return yeah made a plea in a letter. the request has been defied by the white house and the congressional intelligence committee. he should return to the u.s. and face charges which would include leaking classified allegations. >> more allegations against the nsa. the "new york times" reports that intelligence saying see intercepted talking points with moon last november. the paper says it was an operational highlight and a weekly top secret report. the white house has not commented on that article. ♪ >> cold air is slowly working it's way southward from the north pole and as it does that it starts to wrap up our tropical storm season. most of that cold air as it pushes down towards the intertropicaat the tropical co convergence zon. it would be typhoons in the pacific. falling apart. ati typhoon off the shores of tiawan. it's going to head towards vietnam. it's going it move over cooling waters and there is an up well over the coast of vietnam. this storm is going
. word from edward snowden that the u.s. has eavesdropped on frenchmen, even on angela merkel's cell phone. a furious merkel called president obama to complain. >> the president spoke to angela merkel, reassured her that the president is not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. >> reporter: but the white house did not deny that it had happened. >> is not monitoring, will not monitor. i think you're missing a tense there. you've got your president progressive there, you got your simple future, but you're missing your past progressive. >> reporter: the secretary of state has been putting out fires here, there and everywhere. especially over u.s. policy toward syria. after two years of war and the assad regime's chemical attack killing more than a thousand civilians, including children, the saudis accused president obama of backing down, even helping assad butcher his own people. >> the shameful way that the world community accepts the impunity of the butcher of syria is a blot on the conscience of the world. >> reporter: furious that the u.s. did not carry out its thre
edward snowden is reinforcing the notion that u.s. spying spreads wide and goes deep. the latest bombshell, partly denied by the obama administration, appears in the "washington post." it says u.s. intelligence agencies have gained access to hundreds of millions of google and yahoo user accounts by secretly tapping into company data centers. late today, six top tech companies-- yahoo, google, aol, apple, microsoft and facebook-- sent a letter to congress, calling for enhanced privacy protections. barton gellman broke the story for "the washington post." welcome, bart gellman, how are you? welcome to the newshour. what is the difference between what you're reporting that happened and what the white house and the administration is pushing back at and saying didn't happen? >> well, there have been several versions of it but so far they have not denied any of the facts stated in the story. yesterday general alexander, the head of the n.s.a., denied that the n.s.a. is tapping into the servers or databases or data centers of google and yahoo! that's not what we said. what we said is th
's been talked about edward snowden getting clemency. he has asked for that. should he get clemency? >> no. he's not getting clemency. the fact he broke the law, he stole classified material. what i ask the question is, who has been fired at the nsa for being so sloppy, so negligent to allow a 29-year-old to allow a 29-year-old to walk away with highly classified material? nobody has to my knowledge. >> important question. senator leahy, thank you so much for your time this afternoon. we appreciate it. >>> coming up, big news at the supreme court. nbc news justice correspondent pete williams joins me next. stay with us. you're giving away pie? would you like apple or cherry? cherry. oil...or cream? definitely cream. [ male announcer ] never made with hydrogenated oil. oh, yeah. [ male announcer ] always made with real cream. the sound of reddi wip is the sound of joy. see who does good work and compare costs. it doesn't usually work that way with health care. but with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment options and estimates for how much i'll pay. that h
that they felt that way in covering this important story in mali. >> n.s.a. whistle blower edward snowden sounding off. >> we're going to tell you what's in his open letter. why he's asking the u.s. for clemency. >> it feels like 2012 all over again. mitt romney attacking president obama over health care. why the former presidential candidate jumped into the debate. >> a special look at aging around the globe, starting in afghanistan, where life expectancy is among the lowest in the world. >> we're taking a live look at egypt right now. the protests there, you can see breaking up very quickly, just an hour ago. we saw hundreds of people outside of the courthouse where mohamed morsi's trial has just been adjourned to the new year. we'll be right back. >> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> some democrats in washington are worried they're going to lose jobs over the ongoing n.s.a. scandal. we'll talk with an experienced democratic strategist. >> let's get a look at what temperatures we can expect to see across the nation. i'm he can specking a lot of low temperatures. >> a l
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
known about it. lawmakers say new leaks from edward snowden about the u.s. intercepting phone calls from other officials are really hurting relations. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we have listened in. so i think we have repair work to do. bill: brazil's president canceled a state visit over nsa leaks that indicated her phone calls had been listened to. bill? bill: what is the white house going to respond to or how will it respond now to these leaks, wendell? >> reporter: as they dribble out piece by piece it is really hurting things. the president has ordered a review to try to balance security needs with privacy concerns. the same technology that allows the nsa to listen to al qaeda communication, allows it to track diplomats calls. it helps them most global communications are routed through the u.s. the president says essentially everybody does this. the some anger we're hearing at foreign leaders
a good point. senator dianne feinstein, pointing out that edward snowden wants the charges against against him dropped entirely and why he says that his actions are justifiable. martha: speak to any woman goes up in flames while pumping gas. we will study what happens when we come back. energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. take beano before what does that first spoonful taste likok. honey bunches of oats. ching! mmmm! mmmm! mmmm! wow! it's the oats. honey. yeah. honey bunches of oats. this is a great cereal. bill: edwards noted in saying that it shows that he was justifi
. edward snowden wrote an open letter published in a german magazine. he calls it manifesto for truth. jim scuitto, what does he include? >> he tries to make the case that he's not a spy, but a whistle-blower on what he calls the global problem of mass surveillance. in this her he calls the u.s. and britain the worst offenders, and condemns them. the debate he says, quote, they wanted to avoid is now taking place in countries around the world, he wrote, instead of causes damage, the use is causing society to push for political reforms, oversight and new laws. >> i spoke to a senior state department official about this, is snowden had a legal means. he could have pursued it in the nsa, taken it up to the inspector general. if that wasn't good enough, he could have gone to court. in fact he's saying he could come back and face the charge in course. that's the legal way to pursue his case. his position, of course, is he won't get a fair trial here. >> the whole issue of u.s./iranian relations. today we saw a huge demonstration marking the 23rd anniversary of the takeover of the -- what does t
as a victory by people like edward snowden and gl glenn greenwald. >> did you talk to glenn at all? it seems a narrow view when he says is angela merkel a terrorist. you hear from the obama administration side that these intelligence services do a lot more than just only try to intercept communications amongst terrorists. there's a lot more to it. >> right. exactly. a lot of it is about the economic side. a lot of it is, you know, just trying to figure out who's meeting who and what's going on. clearly since 9/11 you and i both know that the emphasis has been on trying to disrupt any kind of plots or plans or conspiracies to commit harm against the united states, either in the u.s. or around the world. and against u.s. allies. so that is why prime minister cameron and other strong u.s. allies have been very robust in their defense of this kind of data collection. we also know that, yes, angela merkel is a strong u.s. ally, but in the past, germany has had, obviously with east germany, it was a communist country, so a lot of spying was done in relation to that. its relations and its trade and
you had the wiki leaks, private manning, and now you have edward snowden who has ansed and international -- international uproar. there are young people who have other ideas and they are willing to take the risk of putting them out. it is an interesting and relatively new development that makes it hard. some secrets should be kept, but it is a question of degree. it looks as though the nsa was doing too much. they have to do some things, obviously. there has to be a balance between security and freedom. could live in a police state where the government knew everything. there has to be a balance between what the government freedom do and our own and civil liberties and rights. they happen to be guerin teed in a thing called the constitution of the united states. host: is glenn greenwald a journalist or an activist? erie: you have to ask him it i think he is a little bit of both. host: why do you say that? guest: he made no secret that he has a point of view. that means he is an activist. he was also writing for "the guardian." papers a liberal, leftish which has done som
assessment that edward snowden have access to raw material in the business record database. why is that the case? i think i would make the case that the current program is one of the most highly read debated programs in the federal government today, and i think that goes to the benefit of folks have privacy concerns or interest in the protection of such data. so what do i mean with its highly rated program? for one, pursuant to the order, but it has to be kept segregated from all other types of raw intelligence your number two, the purpose of the program is purely for characters and purposes the data can't be used for other, for other purposes as we have just been discussing might be the case, in other circumstances. three, the program is reauthorized every 90 days by the foreign intelligence surveillance court. we at nsa together with justice report to fisk every 30 days on use of the data. the program is audited every 90 days by the department of justice. pursuant to the court order, only 22 senior officials may approve wary into the data and those queries have to be based on
were talking about is how remarkable it would be that edward snowden might have known about this and barack obama didn't. then the other thing that strikes me is, you know, obviously i under that these programs are very controversial but the amount of controversy over this program is a little bit higher it seems than when we found out they were collecting bulk data on regular citizens. diane feinstein the chairman of the senate intelligence committee is outraged over this disclosure but fine with the other ones. >> what's worse to express, mike barnacle, that i think it's many world leaders that have this happen to them not just angela merkel and i wonder if that should have come out or if that creates more of a firestorm. but, again, it's not george w. bush sitting there with his head phones on listening to angela merkel's conversations, or president obama, it's very different. mike? >> but, mike, if the president knows, if he's getting this intel and if these reports are right that the white house and the state department signed off on it he knows without sitting there wi
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